It's me in the photos, but I don't own the photos? I'm confused..

Intellectual property is a hard pill for anyone to swallow but it is a necessary conversation to have with any client that your working with. Better yet outlining this in your contracts as photographers will skip the red tape. In reality what happens is that most people aren't aware that the rights of the images taken solely belong to the photographer and either have to be sold or licensed to you for use. I had a recent conversation with a mentor about an image he took that ended up on the billboard for a prominent school. The model contacted him and asked to purchase another photo from the set they previously shot. When her school asked for an image she gave them the one she purchased. So I know what your thinking, she purchased it right? OK so if you purchase an image at a low cost from a photographer they generally are agreed upon that you will use them for Standard licensing (i.e. social media, website, portfolio). When doing national ad campaigns, billboards or magazines the licensing and permissions change for its use. Take a look at a magazine submission guideline, it states if you are not the photographer you must get permission from the photographer or have the photographer submit the work for publication. This may seem like alot of steps but understand as photographers this is for our protection to make sure that our works aren't exploited without compensation or proper credits.

     Credit: www.ellementsmagazine.com/submission/

     Credit: www.ellementsmagazine.com/submission/

 It's super important that as a model you know the ends and outs of how it works at least on this level with photography. This way you don't set unrealistic expectations when working with photographers and vice versa we have to understand how it works with models. Standard model release forms outline exactly how we will use your images and gives your permission for us to use your images in that way. Most times unless otherwise stated we are using your images for portfolio or social media usage. When it's for publication you or your agency are made aware of that in pre shoot letter/email. So in a nut shell no, you don't own the images that the photographer takes of you that is the intellectual property of the photographer and you are not entitled to the images. I stress to ask these questions within the pre shoot this way you don't set an unrealistic expectation and you know how many images you'll recieve and expected delivery time on images. Better to be prepared and happy then unprepared and irritated, if you have any questions feel free to drop your questions below!